Guest Post: A Padstow Guide by Rosie, a Girl on a Journey

The charming fishing port of Padstow lies on the north coast of Cornwall. With some of Cornwall’s best sandy beaches, watersports and lots of brilliant restaurants and shops, including our own Quba Sails store, Padstow makes for a fantastic seaside break.

We’re not the only champions of this fantastic coastal town, as we found when we asked some of our favourite bloggers what they love most about Padstow. We’ve produced a fantastic Padstow guide featuring these experts’ top tips on things to see and do, which you can download here: The Quba Sails Guide to Padstow

This post gives a flavour of what to expect in our Padstow guide. Introducing our guest blogger, Rosie.

Blogger Rosie www.agirlonajourney.com

 

Who?

Rosie, a.k.a. Girl on a Journey. Rosie blogs about fashion, food, travel and everything in between over at www.agirlonajourney.com

Rosie has spent many summer holidays in Cornwall and loves heading to Padstow for fresh fish, Cornish fudge and ice cream.

Enjoy Rosie’s own Padstow guide.

 

Rosie’s Padstow Guide

Best Things To Do

WITH KIDS…

 

Go Crabbing or Fishing

Padstow Guide CyclingPop into the Padstow Angling Centre and pick up a few crabbing lines to dangle into the harbour. (HINT: The best bait for crabs is, without a doubt, bacon!) The Padstow Angling Centre also runs the Emma Kate mackerel fishing trips ; you hop on the Emma Kate and zip out to sea. They provide lines and teach you what to do – you will be surprised with how many you catch. (My record is 13 – I challenge you to beat me!)

Cycle the Camel Trail 

I grew up cycling the Camel Trail every summer as a tradition. We hired bikes in Wadebridge and cycled to Padstow for crabbing and lunch (pasties, of course!) and then cycled back. There are plenty of places to hire bikes in the area – perfect for the more overcast day when the beach isn’t such a viable option.

Crealy Great Adventure Park

Soft play areas, slides, rides, farm animals and everything in between – Crealy’s has enough indoor areas to be a great day out while staying relatively dry on those days when the heavens open and the only other option is monopoly in your pyjamas.

Wadebridge Swimming Pool

Wadebridge Leisure Centre has a 25m indoor swimming pool – good fun for all budding water babies. They also have a fortnightly Saturday night roller disco!

 

FOR ANY AGE…

 

Golf

Whether you have played golf before or are a complete beginner, this is a great family activity for an afternoon in Cornwall. The mini golf course in Padstow is great fun for everyone, or, for the more competent young golfer, the par 3 course at Trevose golf club is loads of fun! Alternatively, head down to St Enodoc golf course  for the most beautiful views and a great 18 hole course right by the coast.

Go Karting

Head on down to St Eval for a bit of high adrenalin Go Karting. With karting from age 7 upwards, this is just another way to keep the kids entertained, whilst having lots of fun yourself – they even allow parents vs kids kart races!

Coasteering

Not strictly a non-water sport but far from your traditional beach activities, coasteering takes you on an adventure along the coast, jumping in pools, swimming through caves and seeing some incredible views while you are at it – lots of fun for the whole family!

 Surf Lessons in Padstow

 

FOR WATERSPORTS…

 

Surf Lessons

Waves Surf School is great for lessons at all levels and all ages. You will learn so much in such a short space of time, you are almost guaranteed to be standing up on the board in your first lesson!

Camel Ski School

Water-skiing, wake-boarding, paddle-boarding and even renting out a boat for the afternoon, head across to Camel Ski School in Rock for all your watersports needs.

 

FOR BEACHES…

 

Constantine Bay

This beautiful, long, sandy beach is ideal for rock-pooling, surfing, body-boarding and sunbathing. (HINT: try climbing to the top of the sand dunes and running or rolling down – so much fun!)

Harlyn Bay

Another great surf beach with very safe tides – there is much less rip on this beach than on some of the others making it much safer for swimming with younger children.

Daymer Bay

A great paddling beach; because this beach is in the estuary there are no waves, making it great for walks, paddling and swimming for young children. (N.B. Dogs are allowed too so you can let yours get in the sea for a swim as well!)

 

Best Places To Eat

 

FOR LUNCH OR DINNER…

 

Waves

Pizzas, burgers, burritos, Thai curry and the best nachos I’ve ever tasted – the team at Waves in St Merryn has got something for everyone!

Number 6 Restaurant

Padstow Guide Chough BakeryChef Paul Ainsworth, whose dessert ‘A Taste Of The Fairground’ featured on The Great British Menu, and his team at Number 6 provide a quality night out with seafood, meat and poultry all cooked to perfection – get a babysitter and have a grown up evening out!

Chough Bakery

You cannot visit Padstow without trying a traditional Cornish pasty! I have done all the research (through many years on the north Cornwall coast) and Chough Bakery is my winner for All-round Best Cornish Pasty. Grab a pasty and sit out on the harbour – you won’t regret it! (TIP: They also do boxes of pasties to take home and cook – grab some at the end of the holiday, pop them in the car and take a bit of Cornwall home with you!)

 

FOR SOMETHING SWEET…

 

Lellizzick FarmhousePadstow Guide Best Ice Cream

A gorgeous B&B in the area with the best Cream Tea I’ve had; scones, jam and a bit of Cornish clotted cream with a pot of tea – perfect!

Harbour Ice

Just around the corner from the Quba Sails store is this wonderful ice cream parlour with more flavours than you will ever be able to try! (HINT: try the
‘Thunder and Lightning’ flavour – honeycomb and
clotted cream, yum!)

The Fudge Shop

Cornish fudge is about as traditional as pasties, cream teas and ice cream and this shop is absolutely the place to go for it, with slabs of different flavours all ready for you to choose – it might be a difficult choice but there is no wrong decision!

 

FOR DRINKS…

 

Bin Two

Bin Two is a great coffee and wine bar in the middle of Padstow, perfect for stocking up on supplies for the evenings ahead or having a few pre-dinner drinks with friends.

The Mariners

With a great Sunday roast, fab seafood and local brews on tap, plus incredible views; The Mariners is a must-visit!

The London Inn

Another great pub with a traditional pub menu, this time in the heart of Padstow. The London Inn is perfect for grabbing a hot chocolate in a break from the crabbing.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed reading Rosie’s Padstow Guide! Let us know if you’ve been to, or plan to visit any of the places on this list by tweeting us @Quba_Sails and don’t forget view our full PDF guide to Padstow with more expert tips, here.

 

An Inspiration: Vicky Carpenter, GB Triathlon Athlete

At Quba, we wholeheartedly embrace the great outdoors and empowering people to conquer it. We are therefore elated to report that Quba-sponsored GB triathlon athlete, Vicky Carpenter, has qualified for her place in the Ironman 70.3 World Championships.

Vicky is a truly inspirational athlete. At 63 years old and a grandmother, she has achieved so much through her strong diligence and dedication to training. She embarked upon her sensational sporting career quite by accident, after taking up jogging less than 10 years ago as a way to clear her head after long days in the classroom as a primary school teacher. The Devonshire hills and cliff tops around her village of Thurlestone were a great reason to get out in the fresh air and Vicky increasingly found a great sense of enjoyment from her new hobby.

 

Vicky Carpenter in Salcombe, Devon

 

Vicky’s son-in-law, Jason McKinlay encouraged her talent; as a personal trainer and Ironman triathlon event veteran, he helped her develop a training schedule to bring out her new-found flair for long distance running. With Jason’s help, Vicky set her sights on completing her first marathon, which she achieved in 2007 – a mere 18 months after her first foray into running as a total beginner. Vicky found this marathon particularly gruelling as she wasn’t used to the flatter terrain in Amsterdam, where the event took place.

With further training with Jason and another marathon event, Vicky turned her attention to the triathlon. Vicky’s late father was a keen cyclist and swimmer, so this new challenge held particular sentimentality. After extensive training, Vicky accomplished her first half-Ironman triathlon event in 2009 at Monaco in France. Vicky has had the triathlon bug ever since.

Since her first triathlon, Vicky has competed in and won numerous events in Europe and the Middle East, recently representing the UK team in the European Championships in Rimini, Italy.

 

Vicky Carpenter Rimini Triathlon Run leg

Vicky Carpenter Rimini Triathlon Cycle leg

Above: Vicky competes for Team GB in Rimini, Italy

Back in the UK following her success in Rimini, Vicky hit training hard for her next event in Norway. At Quba, we are proud to have provided Vicky with an essential bit of kit for her training: the X-10.

Vicky recently told us,

“By far, my best bit of kit was the new, warm and waterproof jacket – thank you so much, Quba – I think I was envied by others in the GB team.”

Vicky Carpenter Team GB Quba Jacket

Vicky Carpenter Team GB Jacket Quba Shop

 

We are proud to reveal that Vicky’s race in Norway was a success and she has triumphantly won her place in the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Austria, where she’ll compete for team GB with the best from across the globe.

The World Championship takes place at the end of August so we hope that we’ll have more of Vicky’s success to share, along with an exclusive interview with the lady herself.

From all of us at Quba Sails – ‘Good luck, Vicky!’

 

Vicky Carpenter Quba Jacket Store

Quba Spotted: Martin Hughes-Games

We love nothing more than seeing our clothing on the backs of Quba’s fantastic customers; whether out on the sea, by the beach or in the city.

Occasionally, a famous face pops up and we’re delighted to share our latest spot of the iconic Quba X-10 jacket, worn by presenter Martin Hughes-Games on BBC Springwatch.

Martin Hughes-Games Quba X10

Martin Hughes-Games Quba Jacket

Martin Hughes Games Blue Jacket Waterproof

Martin Hughes Games Springwatch Jacket

Martin Hughes Games Quba X-10 Jacket

Martin Hughes Games Red Waterproof Jacket

Passionate about wildlife, Martin is a regular presenter on Springwatch alongside Chris Packham, and Michaela Strachan. Looking good for the cameras is always a concern for any television personality though Martin and the team have the added task of being prepared for the outdoors and the different weather conditions they encounter during filming.

We admire Martin’s careful choice of jacket; the X-10 has a comfortable fit which allows the wearer to move freely whilst being protected by the jacket’s warm fleece lining, fully waterproof outer with internal taped seams and a roll-away hood.

The X-10 carries lots of technical features which make this piece ideal for coastal activities, though with Quba’s signature branding and design details including embroidered maritime flags, appliqué patches and unique letter and number motifs, this jacket is as striking as it is practical.

You can view our range of men’s and ladies’ X-10 jackets – or why not customise your own for a truly individual piece?

Quba X Spirit Yachts

Spirit Photoshoot

We tend to think we have a pretty good eye for beauty here at Quba HQ. There are lots of interesting and fun things that we come across in our working day that we appreciate then move on. When Spirit Yachts popped up onto our radar they made us sit up and take notice immediately, without moving anywhere.

Our first thoughts on seeing their magnificent range of yachts was of the JFK era yachting. Martha’s Vineyard, deck shoes, sunglasses and pearly white smiles across sun kissed faces. Harking back to a classy and elegant time of handmade wooden yachts – their styles transported us to a fantastic place.

Although our minds thought of that time and space we also felt a pride that these yachts were made right here in the UK and that the company is doing so well. Based in Ipswich, Spirit started in 1993 and have garnered numerous, prestigious awards and titles as well as being supplier of 007’s Yacht in Casino Royale.

Not just elegant, but also high performance in racing, independently owned and skippered Spirit Yachts won no less than four 1st places in the 2014 Antigua Classics Regatta.

We had a chance to partner with Spirit when they went over to the Singapore Yacht Show as they launched their sexy Spirit 65’ Chloe Giselle. During their time out there they worked on a photo shoot with some of our clothes and bags. We were excited at the prospect of having our nautical heritage mixed with theirs as both brands have synergies that compliment each other.

Quba Rasbora

Designed as a performance orientated sailing sloop, Chloe Giselle combines classical elegance with lightweight construction, excellent engineering, the finest equipment and a superbly fitted interior.  Offering a balanced blend of style and practicality, she provided the perfect backdrop for three days of sailing and lifestyle photography.

We highly suggest that if anyone has the means to own a yacht, or even if you want to daydream about owning one (like we do) then you should head over to Spirit yachts to have a look around at what they are doing. We know that like us, you’ll appreciate the aesthetic and love their designs.

Spirit interior

Jacques Cousteau

There are many people we could write about for Quba, people that are inspirational are well known, or make history. We try to keep a common thread in any of our writing and we’re always tying it back to the core of our DNA – sailing and the sea. Luckily for us, on this topic, we could post everyday until the next millennium and we would still have as vast a pool to select from as the Atlantic.

This week we’re going to have a quick chat about Jacques Cousteau.

 

One of the most influential underwater explorers and filmmakers, he co-invented the aqualung in 1945, and was responsible for teaching many people about life under the sea through his series The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau.

J.C. attracts admiration from the team at Quba not just for being able to tackle adversity (he wanted to be an aviator, was in a terrible car crash and was given goggles to swim for rehabilitation, then decided the sea was where he belonged) but also for his eccentricity. He wore a wetsuit on as many occasions as possible and that red hat, now that’s a genius fashion statement if ever we have seen one. However the red hat was one of the best branding examples we can cite off the… erm.. top of our heads. Now when someone wears a red hat slightly tilted, there’s a good chance someone will mention Jacques.

His ship the Calypso, was an ex-minesweeper that was de-commissioned and bought by a millionaire, then leased to Jacques for one Franc a year. As a subject of a John Denver song of the same name – here. Her fame was well documented, but did you know who the millionaire who bought it was? T.L Guinness, a direct descendent of the brewing family bought it out of being a ferry in Malta after the war and gifted it to Jacques.

There’s so much about Jacques life that’s an interesting read. It’s all truly inspirational stuff, especially when you think his specialities never lay with actually being trained in science, he just had a scientific, and creative mind.

His legacy is not just one of humanity being more in touch with the biology of our planet but also a little more in touch with the fun of living a life. One of his grandsons has followed on his path and has lived underwater for 31 days. Jacques thought that humans would eventually be able to have gills and breathe in the sea, but his grandson Fabien did his feat within a fantastic underwater lab in Key Largo Florida. Bit different. But best of all, the project had a shark submarine called Troy. Now that’s just fantastic.

Then there’s the Life Aquatic, Wes Anderson’s amazing take on, guess who. It’s so inspired that we’re going to leave it for another time and just leave you wth the trailer – Funny!

We’re saluting Jacques as a man that inspires us to do what we love and have fun whilst doing it. Amen to that.

Read all about Jacques here – http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Jacques_Cousteau.aspx

The Sea and Superstitions

According to Wikipedia "Superstition is the belief in supernatural causality—that one event causes another without any natural process linking the two events—such as astrology, religion, omens, witchcraft, prophecies, etc., that contradicts natural science."

We think the UK can hold their crossed fingers up and say they are some of the most superstitious people about. Partly because of our very mixed history of heathen/religious mix; there’s been a long history of where these superstitions come from and which ones have stuck. 5.8 million Brits admit they’re superstitious with walking under a ladder being the most observed belief. 

Walking under a ladder has to be one of the easiest superstitions to figure out. Or so you would think… There’s every chance of something falling on you head, so don’t do it. Mittigating an accident, you would think is the source, but apparently not. It’s to do with breaking the Holy Trinity – see below. So then,  we have no chance of guessing the origin of smashing a mirror or spitting whilst clapping, when seeing a speckled brown and white pony – what’s the meaning of those?

We can see how fishermen/sailors would have to be some of the most superstitious of them all. It’s not hard to imagine going out to sea back in the day was perilous, so death and avoiding it would be at the front of everyone’s mind. But how do you get from sacrificing a boy on the boughs of your ship in Pagan times to the smashing of a champagne bottle that happens now?

The journey of superstitions through time is an interesting and in-depth art, as most of the time, especially in the past there were alcohol and rituals that helped spread the word, and in each iteration as you would expect, the story got longer, more inflated and more exaggerated.

We were particularly interested in the superstition about rabbits at sea and why they were particularly bad luck, to mention or have onboard. This was what sparked this post initially and we have had trouble understanding why it’s in place. So Google didn’t work on figuring it out – what did we do, head to facebook. Quick as a flash Carol Denton came to our rescue ‘Rabbits were taken on board years ago as a " food " source but many escaped their cages and chewed through ropes etc and ate crews food supplies …hence " bad luck " to have or mention Rabbits at sea … – Carol is a super(stition)superstar!

There are some however that just seem common sense. Seaweed taken home and put on the back door will tell of impending bad weather coming in. Seaweed in sun = dry. Seaweed in moist weather = wet. Nice and easy to understand and practical.

Albatrosses are good luck if seen = land must be near. But why is it bad luck if it lands on the boat? Does it mean it’s lost and so will you be? Hard to tell.

Have a look at some of our favouritethe superstitions below from the amazing Old Salt Blog 

  • Some fishermen would not sail if they saw a rat some ashore off their vessel – assuming that the rat knew something they didn’t!
  • Never stir tea with a knife or fork.
  • Never cross knives on the galley table.
  • The teapot must not be emptied after the fishing had started. To empty it might make the ship turn over and sink, or result in a poor trip.
  • Never lay a broom on top of the nets.
  • Fish bones were not burnt.
  • Egg shells were broken into tiny pieces (to stop witches sailing in them).
  • Never cut bread and then turn the loaf upside down.
  • The salt-pot must not be handed from one crewman to another – “pass salt, pass sorrow”.
  • Upturning a hatch cover or sleeping on the stomach were actions said to anticipate the boat turning over and sinking.
  • Losing a hat overboard signified a long trip.
  • Taking a watch to sea signified bad luck.
  • Eat fish from the head to the tail for good luck. If you start at the tail it will warn the shoals away from the shore and back into deep water.
  • Flat-footed folk are unlucky.
  • Don’t use certain words at sea. Don’t mention pigs, fox, cat, hare, salmon or rabbits, the church, or anything to do with the land.
  • Don’t go to sea at the start of the fishing season until you have shed a few drops of blood in a fight or accident.
  • Scottish fishermen should throw one of the crew members overboard and then haul him back in. The fish will follow suit.

It wasn’t just the fishermen that had to be careful here’s some for the wives as well.

  • A woman must not: ‘wash’ clothes otherwise her husband would be ‘washed’ overboard.
  • Don’t ‘wave’ him good-bye or a ‘wave’ would sweep him away.
  • Don’t call out after him once he sets foot outside the front door.
  • Don’t go down on the fish dock to see him off.
  • Don’t whistle, as this would cause a storm at sea: ‘A whistling woman and a crowing hen, Bring the Devil out of his den’.

It’s interesting to see the way these old superstitions are still kept alive and passed down from generation to generation. But we’d love to see the Scottish fishermen who routinely throw their mates overboard!

Robin Knox-Johnston Wins Yachtsman of the Year Award

Robin was this month awarded the Yachtsman of the Year Award from Boats.com – at the age of 75.

Fans of Quba will have alarm bells ringing in their ears as they recollect his Suhaili jacket that we exclusively released a few years back. We were humbled to be able to take the sails from his 1968 record breaking round the world voyage and transform them into our jackets. To be the first single-handed RTW yachtsman is an amazing accomplishment of magnificent proportions.

The jacket is now sold-out, as you would expect, so there's 30 very exclusive jackets on 30 very happy customers.

Congratulations from all at Quba to Robin, for another amazing achievement. Read all about it here

Quba sponsors the Beaujolais Run

The Beaujolais Run became an institution almost instantly. Its got an amazing history dating back to 1970 when Joseph Berkmann and Clement Freud, who had wine columns in The Sunday Times and The Sun (respectively) challenged each other to be first to get a newly produced bottle of Beaujolais (or Beaujolias Nouveau as it’s know) back from Romaneche, France to London.

There was goading in their columns and the first runs were private affairs, but people soon picked up on it and joined in. Culminating in the fastest run being managed by the RAF in a Harrier Jump Jet in the 80’s. That record still stands.

Now the run is an annual affair that takes a more paced route and asks the drivers to not just win through speed, but also throws in cryptic curveballs and navigational quandries. This ensures that the Aston’s can be beaten by the Moris Minor’s – as long as everyone has fun and they raise money for their charities.

If ever there was an event that Quba would fit well into, it’s the driver seat of the Beaujolais Run. We love the whole thing from the starting grid to the chequered flag , and all the oil changes in between.

As is traditional, the event is held every year on the third Thursday in November. See here for full history and run down of the event. We were proud sponsors for the event in 2014 and hooked the staff and marshals up with clothing as well as got our lovely logo onto all the splendid cars. And what lovely cars they were too – see images.

Here’s what EuroTunnel had to say about it, and here’s a bit more about the history from a nice Wine site.

Bring on next year!

Celebrate the X10 every week with Quba Social

If you know about Quba, you know about the X10 jacket. It has been a staple, sturdy and consistent addition to the brand for decades, earning the word Iconic and making it one of the most recognisable jackets on the high street.

To celebrate the silhouette and to spread the word about Quba, on social media every Monday we are posting a top 10 list.

X10 jacket, top 10 list, it all fits as snug as the jacket itself and it’s a way for our customers to understand what we’re all about. The list can range from music to sailing, regional to national and even international.

We’re happy to debate what we included and even happy to be told we’re wrong, the list is shareable and hopefully interesting enough for everyone to join in.

Click the image below to be taken to our facebook page where you can join in and share. 

Oli Wheeldon Expedition to Antarctica (in Quba!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After my Alpine Skills training in California (See here)

I was lucky enough to make it onto the IAE team once again and be able to return to Antarctica in March of 2014.

Not many people get to say they have been to Antarctica, let alone say they returned to Antarctica! I travelled down to Ushuaia, Argentina and got ready to truly go south, lead by Robert Swan OBE, the first person in history to walk to both the North and South Pole.

Armed with the same gear I wore for my training in the mountains (see previous blog on this link) as we crossed the Antarctic convergence zone I was prepared for the sudden drop in temperature.  We made our way between the towering icebergs and islands covered in perfect white. Heading to our first destination, the Lemaire Channel.

A small stretch of ocean protected either side by aggressively rising mountains, these calm waters are very welcoming to anyone after 2 days heading through the notorious Drake Passage being chased by a killer storm.

Whilst the calm waters provide a haven for wildlife such as Minke Whales and Gentoo Penguins, the stillness also creates a threat, freezing. As winter slowly makes it’s way south the oceans start to freeze and it is calm water like this that is first to solidify, when we arrive there are always small icebergs and brash ice, but if the conditions are just right these can combine to create a barrier of ice too risky for our ship.

However thanks to the ingenuity of out captain we safely made it through.

We get to stop off at many incredible locations on the expedition, with Antarctica as our classroom for sustainability and leadership I try and capture as much of each place as possible, using multiple cameras I often have to balance into ambitious angles.

From leaning over the side of the boat to lying on a small ice shelf, I can only hope the results are worth the extra cold. Often they certainly are.

When I return from the trip I use my images to create large oil paintings, capturing views that stood out in particular to me.

I am now more involved with 2041 as they work towards the next big Antarctic project which will be announced on their new website soon – click here.

http://www.oliwheeldon.com/